Sharing? Co-registration In Lead Generation

From a young age we’re taught to share.  By the time we reach adulthood it is, for most of us, a concept we’re comfortable with and embrace – sharing platters, flat shares, Facebook shares and Slideshares.

At Convertr we’re all about sharing too…most of the time.  One area where we’re less generous is in lead generation – specifically, I’m talking about co-registration.

In case you’re not sure what co-registration is (don’t worry, digital advertising is full of jargon) then I’ll quickly explain.

Co-registration is a technique used in lead generation to sell a single lead to multiple advertisers.  A hypothetical example might be that a prospective new customer expresses an interest in a particular car brand.  At that point, as well as being consented for contact from the car brand, the user will also be consented for third-party communications with a simple tick-box.  Once that consent is given, their data can be sold as a ‘lead’ to any number of other advertisers.

Another hypothetical example: a customer shopping for music online completes a transaction and is then presented with a checklist of third party promotions – cheap insurance, flights, groceries…it could be anything.  The user checks the boxes and his details are sent to the advertisers as a lead.

Here at Convertr we’re focused on premium lead generation.  Amongst other things, that means that we’ll avoid co-registration.  Instead, we work to a model whereby every new sales lead generated for our clients is exclusively theirs.

Why?

Sharing Leads Means Sharing Attention

Whether you’re sharing your leads with direct competitors or businesses from different verticals, you’re going to have to work hard to grab your potential customer’s attention and convince them to spend with you.  People tend to limit their own spending, and co-registered leads put you in the mix with lots of competitors.  Wouldn’t you prefer to be one-on-one with your customers?  That way you have their full attention.

Co-registration Has A Low Barrier to Entry

It’s counter-intuitive, perhaps, but if you make it too easy for a customer to sign up as a lead, there’s the potential to reduce the rate at which you convert them into successful sales.  Why?  Well, moderate barriers to entry serve to qualify interest.

Consider a nice new laptop worth, say, £1,500.  If I asked you to simply check a box to say you were interested in it, the chances are that you would.  What if I asked you for your name?  And your email address?  Perhaps now you’re considering your interest a little more carefully.

In lead generation, volume of leads is only part of the equation.  The magic ratio you’re looking for is volume:quality.  And quality comes from collecting leads from people who are genuinely interested.

Contact After Co-registration Can Be Considered Spammy

We’re not saying that it is spam, but we are saying that there’s an increased likelihood that it will be considered spammy by the consumer.  After all, if you’re co-registering by checking third-party opt-ins, you don’t really know who you’re expecting to hear from.  Depending on how relevant the advertiser’s offering is, it could be welcomed with open arms, or considered to be completely unsolicited.  Why run the risk of the latter result?  With explicit consent on a ‘one lead for one advertiser’ basis, the risk of being considered spammy is virtually zero.

Co-registration is generally low-cost, which can be compelling for marketers.  Budgets are tight, and a low cost per lead can give the impression of great value.  However, as I mentioned already, the true success metric in lead generation is volume:quality.  Lots of leads is only good news if those leads convert into sales.  Co-registered leads can disappoint in that respect.